For years, Krishna Nallamilli enjoyed a career outside of the family business, Aditya Educational Institutions. A self-described tech geek, Krishna was making waves in India‘s Southern tech-hub Bangalore working as a software engineer.

In 2008, he agreed to come back and help out in the family business only after making himself a promise – if it was not working out after a year, he would happily return to his previous life. He never turned back.

Finding his place within the organisation, however, was no easy task. He had to build confidence in team members that did not see him as a legitimate leader and find a way of working with family members without jeopardising the relationship with them. Establishing boundaries to help separate the different parts of his life was the only way to move forward.

More than a decade later, Krishna leads two successful business. He remains Vice-Chairman at Aditya and is also Co-Founder and CTO of Kimo, an education-related venture he launched with a classmate he met while at Harvard Business School.

We sat down with Krishna Nallamilli to hear more about his journey.

Growing Together Apart
Image courtesy of Krishna Nallamilli.

What was it like to join the family business?

It took me almost two years just to understand everything that was happening around me. Coming directly from a software engineering background into this environment was a big shock.

I didn’t know how to manage my family relationships or professional relationships. I have many friends in family businesses, and it’s something we always talk about – how it’s impossible to prepare someone for this. Learning to thrive in a family business environment is an iterative process.

The ability to manage many different relationships simultaneously is key. There are family dynamics to contend with, and then, from a professional perspective, people may expect you to work in a different way than what you’ve already established elsewhere.

How did you find a balance?

My journey hasn’t been an easy one. I’ve had to make some tough decisions that offended my family from time to time. I’ve had to let some long-time employees go, which is never easy. I stayed my course, however, because I knew unequivocally that these were the right decisions to make.

About six months after I started, I realised that some of my employees did not accept the legitimacy of my leadership because, in their eyes, I was little more than a kid born with a silver spoon in his mouth. Several of our key employees were okay with my dad but not with me.

Instead of letting their disapproval distract me, I decided to focus on growth, finding ways to implement the changes that I knew were needed. I built a small team I trusted and with whom I could communicate. This involved promoting a few people that I saw as undervalued – my first line of defence. They became familiar with my leadership style, which allowed me to use them as a buffer to communicate my expectations with the rest of the staff.

At the same time, I made sure everyone knew I had an open-door policy, which is still in place today. If anybody has an issue, they can just walk into my office. Back then, some of those meetings kept me in the office until 10:30 or 11:00 at night.

“I saw that if I removed specific family dynamics from the equation, my problems weren’t unique. Others face the same struggles and overcome them.”

What has helped you grow as a leader? 

When I joined the family business, I knew that I needed to expand my knowledge if I wanted to succeed. So, I spent a considerable amount of time reading books and trying to understand different perspectives. The biographies of other business leaders were helpful. I saw that if I removed specific family dynamics from the equation, my problems weren’t unique. Others face the same struggles and overcome them.

To expand my circle of knowledge in more of a homegrown way, I created a small support group of other family business leaders in the city who are mostly in a similar age bracket – 25 to 45. We meet up once a week for about an hour to exchange ideas and share experiences.

This community is a blessing. If someone needs to complain about their father, they can share what happened, and they know they are talking to a group who can understand and appreciate what they are going through.

I augment these practices with travel, where I continue to learn by meeting like-minded people at conferences and other business events. I’ll make a dedicated trip to the US or UK to meet people and hear from them how they run their business, with a particular interest in how they implement change and initiate new projects. If I want to introduce something new, I do not need approval from my employees, but I do need the support of my family.

What is your working relationship with your brother like?

We are still miles apart in terms of where and how we work. When my father stepped down, we were each given our own vertical, and there are only a few areas of overlap between these verticals. Despite being in the business together for almost 12 years, our professional paths have crossed only five or six times. There’s never been a situation where we felt we were impinging on each other’s territory.

That said, we value each other’s perspective and advise each other in a professional capacity. Every once in a while, we’ll call each other to talk about the challenges we are facing. I’ll give him my suggestions and vice versa.

“Through Kimo’s development, I’ve evolved as a leader, and my roles have changed as a result. Now, on top of serving as head of operations and finance, I bring strategy and innovation to the family business as well.”

How do you incorporate your passion for technology?

I didn’t at first, but eventually, I realised that in leaving this part of my life behind, I wasn’t utilising my core strengths. So, I came up with some ways we could use technology to improve the learning experience. There are many flaws in the way we learn and teach – we wanted to find a system that changed that. That’s how Kimo was born.

Kimo is a content curation platform that makes current educational models more efficient. Our core belief is that personalisation should be part of the content design itself. Kimo is an AI and machine learning platform that adapts content to suit the unique learning needs of the individual better.

Through Kimo’s development, I’ve evolved as a leader, and my roles have changed as a result. Now, on top of serving as head of operations and finance, I bring strategy and innovation to the family business as well.

Kimo operates separately from Aditya, but it is, of course, related to it almost in a symbiotic way. Being the Co-Founder and CTO of a small team scattered around the world provides tremendous growth and learning opportunities.